Poor diet is a factor in one in five deaths, global disease study reveals

Study compiling data from every country finds people are living longer but millions are eating wrong foods for their health

Poor diet is a factor in one in five deaths around the world, according to the most comprehensive study ever carried out on the subject.

Millions of people are eating the wrong sorts of food for good health. Eating a diet that is low in whole grains, fruit, nuts and seeds and fish oils and high in salt raises the risk of an early death, according to the huge and ongoing study Global Burden of Disease.

The study, based at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, compiles data from every country in the world and makes informed estimates where there are gaps. Five papers on life expectancy and the causes and risk factors of death and ill health have been published by the Lancet medical journal.

It finds that people are living longer. Life expectancy in 2016 worldwide was 75.3 years for women and 69.8 for men. Japan has the highest life expectancy at 84 years and the Central African Republic has the lowest at just over 50. In the UK, life expectancy for a man born in 2016 is 79, and for a woman 82.9.

Diet is the second highest risk factor for early death after smoking. Other high risks are high blood glucose which can lead to diabetes, high blood pressure, high body mass index (BMI) which is a measure of obesity, and high total cholesterol. All of these can be related to eating the wrong foods, although there are also other causes.

causes of death graphic

This is really large, Dr Christopher Murray, IHMEs director, told the Guardian. It is amongst the really big problems in the world. It is a cluster that is getting worse. While obesity gets attention, he was not sure policymakers were as focused on the area of diet and health as they needed to be. That constellation is a really, really big challenge for health and health systems, he said.

The problem is often seen as the spread of western diets, taking over from traditional foods in the developing world. But it is not that simple, says Murray. Take fruit. It has lots of health benefits but only very wealthy people eat a lot of fruit, with some exceptions.

Sugary drinks are harmful to health but eating a lot of red meat, the study finds, is not as big a risk to health as failing to eat whole grains. We need to look really carefully at what are the healthy compounds in diets that provide protection, he said.

undernourishment graphic

Prof John Newton, director of health improvement at Public Health England, said the studies show how quickly diet and obesity-related disease is spreading around the world. I dont think people realise how quickly the focus is shifting towards non-communicable disease [such as cancer, heart disease and stroke] and diseases that come with development, in particular related to poor diet. The numbers are quite shocking in my view, he said.

The UK tracks childhood obesity through the school measurement programme and has brought in measures to try to tackle it. But no country in the world has been able to solve the problem and it is a concern that we really need to think about tackling globally, he said.

Today, 72% of deaths are from non-communicable diseases for which obesity and diet are among the risk factors, with ischaemic heart disease as the leading cause worldwide of early deaths, including in the UK. Lung cancer, stroke, lung disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder) and Alzheimers are the other main causes in the UK.

The success story is children under five. In 2016, for the first time in modern history, fewer than 5 million children under five died in one year a significant fall compared with 1990, when 11 million died. Increased education for women, less poverty, having fewer children, vaccinations, anti-malaria bed-nets, improved water and sanitation are among the changes in low-income countries that have brought the death rate down, thanks to development aid.

People are living longer but spending more years in ill health. Obesity is one of the major reasons. More than a billion people worldwide are living with mental health and substance misuse disorders. Depression features in the top 10 causes of ill health in all but four countries.

Our findings indicate people are living longer and, over the past decade, we identified substantial progress in driving down death rates from some of the worlds most pernicious diseases and conditions, such as under age-five mortality and malaria, said Murray Yet, despite this progress, we are facing a triad of trouble holding back many nations and communities obesity, conflict, and mental illness, including substance use disorders.

In the UK, the concern is particularly about the increase in ill-health that prevents people from working or having a fulfilling life, said Newton. A man in the UK born in 2016 can expect only 69 years in good health and a woman 71 years.

This is yet another reminder that while were living longer, much of that extra time is spent in ill-health. It underlines the importance of preventing the conditions that keep people out of work and put their long term health in jeopardy, like musculoskeletal problems, poor hearing and mental ill health. Our priority is to help people, including during the crucial early years of life and in middle age, to give them the best chance of a long and healthy later life, he said.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/sep/14/poor-diet-is-a-factor-in-one-in-five-deaths-global-disease-study-reveals

6 million middle-aged people take no exercise

Public Health Englands research suggests large numbers of adults do not walk for 10 minutes at a time once a month

About 6 million middle-aged people in England are endangering their health by not taking so much as a brisk walk once a month, government advisers have said.

Clinicians said such a lack of exercise increases an individuals risk of prematurely developing serious health conditions including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dementia and cancer.

Public Health England (PHE) said 41% of the 15.3 million English adults aged 40 to 60 walk less than 10 minutes continuously each month at a brisk pace of at least 3mph.

PHE has launched a health campaign targeting the sedentary middle-aged by encouraging them to walk to the shop instead of using a car and to take up walking on lunch breaks to add many healthy years to their lives.

Health leaders believe that 10 minutes walking a day is likely to be seen as achievable by people who are chronically inactive and that the health benefits include increased fitness, improved mood, a healthier body weight and a 15% reduction in the risk of dying prematurely.

PHE said walking required no skill, facilities or equipment and was more accessible and acceptable than other forms of physical activity for most people. Guidance issued by the UKs four chief medical officers in 2011 instructed the British population on how much exercise they should be participating in each week.

They said that adults should do at least two and a half hours of moderately intensive activity a week.

The PHE report said a quarter of the English population are inactive, doing less than 30 minutes of exercise a week. For some of these individuals 150 minutes may seem an unrealistic aim, according to the PHE report.

PHEs One You campaign is urging those people to take up the challenge of walking briskly for 10 minutes a day. As part of the drive it has released the Active 10 app which will help users achieve the goal and GPs will be recommending it to their patients to help build up their activity levels.

Dr Jenny Harries, the deputy medical director of PHE, said: I know first hand that juggling the priorities of everyday life often means exercise takes a back seat.
Walking to the shops instead of driving or going for a brisk 10-minute walk on your lunch break each day can add many healthy years to your life. The Active 10 app is a free and easy way to help anyone build more brisk walking into their daily routine.

Prof Sir Muir Gray, a clinical adviser for the Active 10 app and the One You campaign, added: We all know physical activity is good for your health but for the first time were seeing the effects that easily achievable changes can make. By walking just 10 continuous minutes at a brisk pace every day, an individual can reduce their risk of early death by 15%.

They can also prevent or delay the onset of disability and further reduce their risk of serious health conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dementia and some cancers.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/24/around-6-million-middle-aged-english-people-take-no-exercise

Forget five a day, eat 10 portions of fruit and veg to cut risk of early death

Scientists say even just 2.5 portions daily can lower chance of heart disease, stroke, cancer and premature death

Five portions of fruit and veg a day is good for you, but 10 is much better and could prevent up to 7.8 million premature deaths worldwide every year, say scientists.

The findings of the study led by Imperial College London may dismay the two in three adults who struggle to manage three or four portions perhaps some tomatoes in a sandwich at lunchtime, an apple and a few spoonfuls of peas at dinner.

All of that is good because a daily intake of even 200g, or two and a half standard 80g portions, is associated with a 16% reduced risk of heart disease, an 18% reduced risk of stroke, a 13% reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, 4% reduced risk of cancer and a 15% reduction in the risk of premature death.

But the study suggests we should be piling up platefuls of vegetables and raiding the fruit bowl every day if we want the best chance of avoiding chronic diseases or an early death.

We wanted to investigate how much fruit and vegetables you need to eat to gain the maximum protection against disease, and premature death. Our results suggest that although five portions of fruit and vegetables is good, 10 a day is even better, said Dr Dagfinn Aune, lead author of the research from the School of Public Health at Imperial.

Eating up to 800g of fruit and vegetables equivalent to 10 portions and double the recommended amount in the UK was associated with a 24% reduced risk of heart disease, a 33% reduced risk of stroke, a 28% reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, a 13% reduced risk of total cancer, and a 31% reduction in premature deaths.

What does 800g look like?

And not all fruit and veg are created equal. Apples and pears, citrus fruits, salads and green leafy vegetables such as spinach, lettuce and chicory, and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower were found to be best at preventing heart disease and stroke.

To reduce the risk of cancer, however, the menu should include green vegetables, such as green beans; yellow and orange vegetables such as peppers and carrots; and cruciferous vegetables.

The researchers did not find any difference between the protective effects of cooked and raw fruit and vegetables.

Fruit and vegetables have been shown to reduce cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and to boost the health of our blood vessels and immune system, said Aune. This may be due to the complex network of nutrients they hold. For instance they contain many antioxidants, which may reduce DNA damage, and lead to a reduction in cancer risk.

Compounds called glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, activate enzymes that may help prevent cancer. Fruit and vegetables may also have a beneficial effect on the naturally occurring bacteria in our gut, he said.

Toddler
Most people struggle to eat three or four portions a day, the study shows. Photograph: Simon Masters/Getty Images/Vetta

And it will not be possible to bottle the effects of fruit and vegetables or put them in a pill, he said. Forget the supplements. Most likely it is the whole package of beneficial nutrients you obtain by eating fruits and vegetables that is crucial to health, he said. This is why it is important to eat whole plant foods to get the benefit, instead of taking antioxidant or vitamin supplements (which have not been shown to reduce disease risk).

The analysis in the International Journal of Epidemiology pooled the results from 95 different studies involving a total of approximately 2 million people. They assessed up to 43,000 cases of heart disease, 47,000 cases of stroke, 81,000 cases of cardiovascular disease, 112,000 cancer cases and 94,000 deaths.

Aune said more research was needed, but it is clear from this work that a high intake of fruit and vegetables hold tremendous health benefits, and we should try to increase their intake in our diet.

Sarah Toule, from the World Cancer Research Fund, said: This interesting research shows just how incredibly important vegetables and fruit are as part of a healthy diet. In fact, theyre essential for maintaining a healthy weight, which our own evidence has shown reduces the risk of 11 common cancers.

People should aim to eat at least five portions of vegetables and fruit a day but the more the better. If people find this hard, why not start by adding an extra portion of fruit or veg a day to your lunch or try swapping one of your naughty snacks for a piece of fruit?

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/feb/23/five-day-10-portions-fruit-veg-cut-early-death

World Health Organization: Processed Meats Cause Cancer

Very sad news for bacon lovers.

The World Health Organization announced Monday that cured and processed meats like bacon, sausage, hot dogs and ham cause cancer, adding the foods to a top-tier list of carcinogenic substances that includes alcohol, cigarettes, asbestos, and arsenic.

Processed meats can be bundled with these threatening carcinogens because of their link with bowel cancer, according to a report from WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer, though their inclusion doesn’t mean that bacon causes cancer at the same rate as, say, smoking. 

“For an individual, the risk of developing colorectal (bowel) cancer because of their consumption of processed meat remains small, but this risk increases with the amount of meat consumed,” IARC epidemiologist Dr. Kurt Straif said in a statement.

The agency estimates that a 50-gram portion of processed meat eaten daily increased the risk for bowel cancer by 18 percent. That’s about three slices of cooked bacon. 

The report also links red meat to cancer. It classifies beef, lamb and pork as “probable” carcinogens in a second-tier list that also includes glyphosate, the active ingredient in many weedkillers.

The findings, which are based on more than 800 studies, are already receiving pushback from meat industry groups that argue meat is part of a balanced diet and that the cancer risk assessments needs to expand to include risk in the context of lifestyle and environment. 

“We simply dont think the evidence support any causal link between any red meat and any type of cancer,” said Shalene McNeill, executive director of human nutrition at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

Such lifestyle and environmental risks have been studied extensively, however, and the IARC noted this broader context was included in the study: 

In making this evaluation, the Working Group took into consideration all the relevant data, including the substantial epidemiological data showing a positive association between consumption of red meat and colorectal cancer and the strong mechanistic evidence. Consumption of red meat was also positively associated with pancreatic and with prostate cancer.

Both processed and red meats have been linked with cancer in the past. A 2013 study from researchers at the University of Zurich found that consuming processed meats increased the risk of dying from both heart disease and cancer. In 2012, a review published in British Journal of Cancer linked meats like bacon and sausage to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, a disease with particularly poor survival rates. It’s no secret that red meat is rife with bad cholesterol and fats that are tied to diabetes and heart disease. 

Unfortunately, the average American consumes about 18 pounds of bacon each year. Our nation eats more red meat than most of the world, though consumption has begun to dip in the past couple of years. In 2014, chicken was more popular than beef for the first time in over 100 years, showing that the Food and Drug Administration’s recommendations for feeding on “leaner meats” may be making an impact on the national plate. 

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/10/26/world-health-organization-processed-meats-cause-cancer_n_8388732.html

Color Genomics goes beyond cancer with a test for heart health

Cancer and heart disease are the two leading causes of death in the United States. So far, Color Genomics has been focused on testing for mutations leading to a higher risk of certain cancers. But, today the four-year-old company is introducing a new category of genetic testing for cardiovascular health.

The new Color Hereditary High Cholesterol Testwill tell you if you have a genetic mutation for something called Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH), a hereditary condition that causes high cholesterol levels leading to coronary heart disease.

Possibly 34 million people are affected by the disease worldwide. About one in fifty people with high cholesterol have the mutation. The problem? Most people with the genetic mutation dont know they have it until they have a potentially fatal heart attack.

Like cancer testing, earlier detection of the mutation can prevent the disease, improve survival rates and reduce medical costs. And thats where Color hopes its new test can help.

We started with cancer because it was one of the leading causes of death and the science around genetics and cancer was well-established, Color chief marketing officer Katie Jacobs Stanton told TechCrunch. Similarly, there is well-established science around genetics and cardiovascular diseaseGiven that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death (and combined with cancer costs over $1.1trillion per year), we saw an opportunity to help more people learn their risk of developing hereditary cardiovascular conditions and proactively managing their heart health using genetic data.

Unlike at-home genetic tests like 23andMe, you order this one through your doctor. The test is $249 for new customers. However, those whove gone through Colors cancer testing can purchase the cardiovascular test for an additional $150.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/10/color-genomics-goes-beyond-cancer-with-a-test-for-heart-health/

Health effects of coffee: Where do we stand?

(CNN)It’s one of the age-old medical flip-flops: First coffee’s good for you, then it’s not, then it is — you get the picture.

Today, the verdict is thumbs up, with study after study extolling the merits of three to five cups of black coffee a day in reducing risk for everything from melanoma to heart disease, multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, liver disease, prostate cancer, Alzheimer’s, computer-related back pain and more.
To stay completely healthy with your coffee consumption, you’ll want to avoid packing it with calorie laden creams, sugars and flavors. And be aware that a cup of coffee in these studies is only 8 ounces; the standard “grande” cup at the coffee shop is double that at 16 ounces.
    And how you brew it has health consequences. Unlike filter coffee makers, the French press, Turkish coffee or the boiled coffee popular in Scandinavian countries fail to catch a compound called cafestol in the oily part of coffee that can increase your bad cholesterol or LDL.
    Finally, people with sleep issues or uncontrolled diabetes should check with a doctor before adding caffeine to their diets, as should pregnant women, as there is some concern about caffeine’s effect on fetal growth and miscarriage. And some of the latest research seems to say that our genes may be responsible for how we react to coffee, explaining why some of us need several cups to get a boost while others get the jitters on only one.
    But as you know, the news on coffee has not always been positive. And the argument over the merits of your daily cup of joe dates back centuries. Let’s take a look at the timeline.
    1500’s headline: Coffee leads to illegal sex
    Legend has it that coffee was discovered by Kaldi, an Ethiopian goatherd, after he caught his suddenly frisky goats eating glossy green leaves and red berries and then tried it for himself. But it was the Arabs who first started coffeehouses, and that’s where coffee got its first black mark.
    Patrons of coffeehouses were said to be more likely to gamble and engage in “criminally unorthodox sexual situations,” according to author Ralph Hattox. By 1511 the mayor of Mecca shut them down. He cited medical and religious reasons, saying coffee was an intoxicant and thus prohibited by Islamic law, even though scholars like Mark Pendergrast believe it was more likely a reaction to the unpopular comments about his leadership. The ban didn’t last long, says Pendergrast, adding that coffee became so important in Turkey that “a lack of sufficient coffee provided grounds for a woman to seek a divorce.”
    1600’s headline: Coffee cures alcoholism but causes impotence
    As the popularity of coffee grew and spread across the continent, the medical community began to extol its benefits. It was especially popular in England as a cure for alcoholism, one of the biggest medical problems of the time; after all, water wasn’t always safe to drink, so most men, women and even children drank the hard stuff.
    Local ads such as this one in 1652 by coffee shop owner Pasqua Rose popularized coffee’s healthy status, claiming coffee could aid digestion, prevent and cure gout and scurvy, help coughs, headaches and stomachaches, even prevent miscarriages.
    But in London, women were concerned that their men were becoming impotent, and in 1674 The Women’s Petition Against Coffee asked for the closing of all coffeehouses, saying in part: “We find of late a very sensible Decay of that true Old English Vigour. … Never did Men wear greater Breeches, or carry less in them…”
    1700’s headline: Coffee helps you work longer
    By 1730, tea had replaced coffee in London as the daily drink of choice. That preference continued in the colonies until 1773, when the famous Boston Tea Party made it unpatriotic to drink tea. Coffeehouses popped up everywhere, and the marvelous stimulant qualities of the brew were said to contribute to the ability of the colonists to work longer hours.
    1800’s headline: Coffee will make you go blind. Have a cup of hot wheat-bran drink instead
    In the mid-1800s America was at war with itself and one side effect is that coffee supplies ran short. Enter toasted grain-based beverage substitutes such as Kellogg’s “Caramel Coffee” and C.W. Post’s “Postum” (still manufactured). They advertised with anti-coffee tirades to boost sales. C.W. Post’s ads were especially vicious, says Pendergrast, claiming coffee was as bad as morphine, cocaine, nicotine or strychnine and could cause blindness.
    1916 headline: Coffee stunts your growth
    While inventions and improvements in coffee pots, filters and processing advanced at a quick pace throughout the 1900s, so did medical concerns and negative public beliefs about the benefits of coffee.
    Good Housekeeping magazine wrote about how coffee stunts growth. And concerns continued to grow about coffee’s impact on common aliments of the era, such as nervousness, heart palpitations, indigestion and insomnia.
    1927 headline: Coffee will give you bad grades, kids
    In Science Magazine, on September 2, 1927, 80,000 elementary and junior high kids were asked about their coffee drinking habits. Researchers found the “startling” fact that most of them drank more than a cup of coffee a day, which was then compared to scholarship with mostly negative results.
    1970’s and ’80’s headline: Coffee is as serious as a heart attack
    A 1973 study in the New England Journal of Medicine of more than 12,000 patients found drinking one to five cups of coffee a day increased risk of heart attacks by 60% while drinking six or more cups a day doubled that risk to 120%.
    Another New England Journal of Medicine study, in 1978, found a short-term rise in blood pressure after three cups of coffee. Authors called for further research into caffeine and hypertension.
    A 38-year study by the Johns Hopkins Medical School of more than a 1,000 medical students found in 1985 that those who drank five or more cups of coffee a day were 2.8 times as likely to develop heart problems compared to those who don’t consume coffee. But the study only asked questions every five years, and didn’t isolate smoking behavior or many other negative behaviors that tend to go along with coffee, such as doughnuts. Or “Doooonuts,” if you’re Homer Simpson.
    Millennium headline: Coffee goes meta
    Now begins the era of the meta-analysis, where researchers look at hundreds of studies and apply scientific principles to find those that do the best job of randomizing and controlling for compounding factors, such as smoking, obesity, lack of exercise and many other lifestyles issues. That means that a specific study, which may or may not meet certain standards, can’t “tip the balance” one way or another. We take a look at some of the years. The results for coffee? Mostly good.
    2001 headline: Coffee increases risk of urinary tract cancer
    But first, a negative: A 2001 study found a 20% increase in the risk of urinary tract cancer risk for coffee drinkers, but not tea drinkers. That finding was repeated in a 2015 meta-analysis. So, if this is a risk factor in your family history, you might want to switch to tea.
    2007 headline: Coffee decreases risk of liver cancer
    Some of these data analyses found preventive benefits for cancer from drinking coffee, such as this one, which showed drinking two cups of black coffee a day could reduce the risk of liver cancer by 43%. Those findings were replicated in 2013 in two other studies.
    2010 headline: Coffee and lung disease go together like coffee and smoking
    A meta-analysis found a correlation between coffee consumption and lung disease, but the study found it impossible to completely eliminate the confounding effects of smoking.
    2011 headline: Coffee reduces risk of stroke and prostate cancer
    A meta-analysis of 11 studies on the link between stroke risk and coffee consumption between 1966 and 2011, with nearly a half a million participants, found no negative connection. In fact, there was a small benefit in moderate consumption, which is considered to be three to five cups of black coffee a day. Another meta-analysis of studies between 2001 and 2011 found four or more cups a day had a preventive effect on the risk of stroke.
    As for prostate cancer, this 2011 study followed nearly 59,000 men from 1986 to 2006 and found drinking coffee to be highly associated with lower risk for the lethal form of the disease.
    2012 headline: Coffee lowers risk of heart failure
    More meta-analysis of studies on heart failure found four cups a day provided the lowest risk for heart failure, and you had to drink a whopping 10 cups a day to get a bad association.
    2013 headline: Coffee lowers risk of heart disease and helps you live longer
    For general heart disease a meta-analysis of 36 studies with more than 1.2 million participants found moderate coffee drinking seemed to be associated with a low risk for heart disease; plus, there wasn’t a higher risk among those who drank more than five cups a day.
    How about coffee’s effects on your overall risk of death? One analysis of 20 studies, and another that included 17 studies, both of which included more than a million people, found drinking coffee reduced your total mortality risk slightly.
    2015 headline: Coffee is practically a health food
    As a sign of the times, the U.S. Department of Agriculture now agrees that “coffee can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle,” especially if you stay within three to five cups a day (a maximum of 400 mg of caffeine), and avoid fattening cream and sugar. You can read their analysis of the latest data on everything from diabetes to chronic disease here.
    2017 headline: Yes, coffee still leads to a longer life
    The largest study to date on coffee and mortality surveyed 520,000 people in 10 European countries and found that regularly drinking coffee could significantly lower the risk of death.
    Another study with a focus on non-white populations had similar findings. That study surveyed 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites. The varying lifestyles and dietary habits of the people observed in both studies led the authors to believe that coffee’s impact on longevity doesn’t have to do with how its prepared or how people drink it — it has to do with the beverage’s biological effect on the body.
    But stay tuned. There’s sure to be another meta-study, and another opinion. We’ll keep you updated.

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/14/health/coffee-health/index.html

    Does Fatherhood Make Men Healthier?

    With Fathers Day here yet again, its time to address the question on everyones mind: What is the health impact of being a father?

    As with all critical questions relating to life and death, there is medical literature to help guide us. First, the epidemiologic: The proportion of adults who choose not to be parents is growing and sits at 20 percent or so. Most of the data is from women and for good reasonfemales have a shorter, more knowable duration of fertility. Plus they always know when they are a parent.

    A guy, however, may impregnate and run, never knowing of the child he left behind (see: 1,001 traveling salesman and milkman jokes). Plus, he can remain potent a long while: Strom Thurmond fathered several children in his seventies while Saul Bellow last became a father at age 84.

    Given the vagueness of the starting and stopping point for men, it is unsurprising that I could find no report that estimated the proportion of childless men. There is however a mature vocabulary for men and women alike: Childlessness can be voluntary or involuntary, has an upbeat newish namechild-freecountless blogs and spirited books, and a political slant around the notion that reproducing is somehow self-adoring and short-sighted.

    The medical side of fatherhood (or its lack) has mostly focused on that group of men who are involuntarily fatherlessi.e., those who have tried but never successfully fathered children. The group that prefers not to procreate represents an unknowable proportion in the various studies but likely sits in the minority.

    Various outcomes have been examined. These include cancer, heart disease, and overall mortality. Each article, though, carries the same extremely important caveat: The causal link between offspring number and medical condition is uncertain at best. Most investigators hypothesize that a subtle hormonal derangement such as too much or too little estrogen or androgen (the hormones involved in determining sexual characteristics) is known to affect the risk of heart disease and stroke and also may render a person less fertile. Therefore the medical problem and the childless state may be consequences of the same physiology and not a linear cause and effect.

    Therefore, a well-performed study of more 137,000 men recruited to an AARP cohort found that married men who have no children have a higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease than men with two or more children, which might be explained by the fact that the same hormone imbalance that was reducing fertility also was increasing risk for cardiovascular disease. These authors, from leading institutions across the U.S., including Stanford and the National Cancer Institute, concluded that their findings agreed with more than a half-dozen similar studies finding an uptick in heart disease among the childless.

    Ditto for prostate cancer, though in the other direction. Prostate cancer, like heart disease, appears related to subtle hormone imbalances; that is why the disease is often treated by using feminizing hormones. Several studies have sought to correlate risk of prostate cancer with number of offspring; most but not all show a lower risk among childless men. Perhaps, authors have speculated, the men who are not able to father because of a touch too much feminizing hormone are protected from some risk for prostate cancer risk by the same imbalance.

    A large Danish study addressing these issues made quite a flurry at the end of 2012 (here, here, and here for example). Any study on population-based disease rates from Denmark should make the newsthey lead the world in well-performed, dispassionate, and statistically balanced inquiry.

    This exploration found that, compared to the childless, the risk of premature mortality for those who had children was sharply reduced: Men with children had half the rate and women, one-fourth. The fine lines of the article (which were not so fine at all but loudly trumpeted) were not read carefully by some. Thankfully, a watchdog group of unskewers at the Science Media Centre examined the actual facts. The group studied was an altogether skewed collection of 21,276 Danish couples who had sought help in an infertility clinic. The researchers then compared the health outcomes of those who successfully did or did not successfully become pregnantand the difference in rates was startling.

    Yet the actual number of premature deaths, as the Science Media group (and the authors themselves) pointed out, went from a really really really small number to just a really really small one. And more importantly, the group studiedthose already seeking help for infertilitywas not representative of the adults who have children without difficulty or those who opt for the child-free life.

    Perhaps then it is time for a new tradition: the Fathers Day resolution, an annual promise dads everywhere should make to embrace the acuteness of the male condition, its fragility in modern life. After all, Fathers Day is the lone moment in the year that celebrates being, well, just a guy. Oh sure, the Super Bowl and all its macho imitators are commemorations of some repulsive male urge best ignored. But being a son or a father or both is its own glorious reward and, man, thats something worth celebrating.

    Read more: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/06/14/does-fatherhood-make-men-healthier

    HIGH Blood Pressure Treatment , Rave Diet Eating Dvd With Mike Anderson,

    The Rave Diet, shows how degenerative diseases like high blood pressure, cancer,heart disease can be successfully healed with dietary treatments and natural supplementation. It explains common misconceptions about cancer, shows how diets designed to fight cancer are more successful than conventional treatments, discusses startling cancer research findings with T. Colin Campbell (The China Study) and has interviews with people who have reversed cancers using diet. It also discusses supplementation and why attitude is important in reversing not only cancer, but any disease. Dr. Crowe and Dr. Esselstyn are from the world-famous Cleveland Clinic Foundation and know something about heart disease. In fact, Dr. Esselstyn directed the longest and most successful heart disease reversal program ever. These interviews will convince you that cardiovascular (heart) disease, the #1 killer in America today, can be reversed by switching to The Rave Diet. What you will get is a virtual one-on-one consultation with some of the world's leading authorities on heart disease reversal. Dr. Pinckney and Dr. Crowe both reversed severe heart disease by adopting The Rave Diet. If you know someone with heart disease – who doesn't? – this will probably be the most valuable film they will ever watch – and from authorities with impeccable credentials. And if you eat to prevent heart disease, you will also prevent the other major chronic diseases that are plaguing Western nations. You will also hear from Dr. Heidrich who, after surgery, treated her breast cancer without chemotherapy, radiation or any other conventional treatments by following The Rave Diet. The Eating DVD is used in wellness clinics throughout the world to motivate people to change their diets and restore their health.

    How To Administer Direct IV Ozone in Home Pt2.3gp

    Dr Saul Pressman, in his book, "The Story of Ozone" lists the different Diseases which we can treat with medical Ozone therapy as below:

    A

    Acariasis
    Acne
    Acrodermatitis
    Acute otitis media
    Acute vestibulopathy
    Addisons disease
    Adenocarcinoma
    Adenovirus
    Adrenalitis
    AIDS
    Alopecia
    ALS (Lou Gehrig disease)
    Alzheimer's disease
    Amebiasis
    Amenorrhea Amyloidosis
    Anal fissures
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    Ankylosing spondylitis
    Anthrax
    Apthous stomatitis
    Arterial occlusion
    Arteriosclerosis
    Arthritis
    Arthrosis
    Asthma
    Athlete's foot
    B

    Babesiosis
    Bacterial pneumonia
    Bartonellosis
    Basalinoma
    Bell palsy
    Bornholm myalgia
    Botulism Bronchitis
    Bronchopulmonary aspergillus
    Broncospasm
    Brucellosis
    Bullous pemphigus
    Burkit lymphoma
    C Cancer of all types
    Candidiasis
    Carbuncles
    Cavernous sinus thrombosis
    Cellulitis
    Cerebral atrophy
    Cerebrovascular accident
    Chagas disease Chicken pox
    Chlamydia
    Cholecystitis
    Chronic pain
    Chronic pulmonary disease
    Cirrhosis of the liver
    Coccidiomycosis
    Colitis
    D Dengue fever
    Dermatitis Diabetes
    Diverticulitis
    E

    Echovirus
    Eczema
    Ehrlichiosis
    Encephalitis
    Encephalomyelitis
    Endocarditis
    Endometritis
    Endophthalmitis
    Enteric fever
    Enteritis necroticans Environmental hypersensitivity
    Epidermoid carcinoma
    Epidermolitic keratosis
    Epidermophytosis
    Epididymitis
    Epstein-Barr virus
    Erysipelas
    Erythema migrans
    F Flavivirus
    Folliculitis
    Food poisoning Fulminant varicella
    Furuncle
    G

    Gangrene
    Genital warts
    Giardiasis
    Glaucoma
    Glioma
    Glomerular membrane disease Glomerulonephritis
    Goodpasture syndrome
    Gout
    Graves disease
    Guillan-Barre syndrome
    H
    Hairy leukoplakia
    Heart arrhythmia
    Heart disease
    Hematoma
    Hemolytic anemia
    Hemorrhage
    Hemorrhagic fever
    Hemorrhoids
    Hepatitis Herpes of all types
    Histoplasmosis
    HIV
    HTLV
    Huntingdon chorea
    Hypercholesterolemia
    Hypersensitivity
    Hyperthyroidism
    Hypotension
    I
    Ichthyosis
    Ileitis Polyoma virus
    Impetigo Influenza
    Intravascular coagulation
    Ischemic optic neuropathy
    K Krohn's disease Kyanasur Forest disease
    L

    Landry syndrome
    Lassa fever
    Leishmaniasis
    Leptospirosis
    Leukemia
    Leukoencephalopathy
    Leukopenia
    Listeriosis Lupus erythematosus
    Lyme disease
    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis
    Lymphogranuloma
    Lymphoid pneumonia
    Lymphoma
    M

    Malaria
    Mastoiditis
    Measles
    Melanoma
    Melioidosis
    Meniere disease
    Migraine
    Molluscum ecthyma
    Mononucleosis
    Morbilloform
    Multiple sclerosis Mumps
    Myalgia
    Myasthenia gravis
    Mycobacterium avium complex
    Mycosis
    Myelitis
    Myocarditis
    Myonecrosis
    Myositis
    N Neutropenia colitis Neurodermatitis
    O

    Ocular trachoma
    Optic nerve dysfunction
    Optic neuritis
    Oral erythema
    Orbital cellulitis
    Orchitis Cryptospiridiosis
    Osteomyelitis
    Osteoporosis
    Osteosarcoma
    Otosclerosis
    P

    Pancreatitis
    Panniculitis
    Papillitis
    Parainfluenza
    Parkinson's disease
    Pediculosis
    Pelvic inflammatory disease
    Pemphigoid
    Pernicious anemia
    Pneumocytosis
    Pneumonia .Poliomyelitis
    Polyateritis
    Poor circulation
    Postpartum fever
    Proctitis
    Prostate enlargement
    Prurigo
    Psoriasis
    Pulmonary toxiplasis
    Pyoderma
    R

    Rabies
    Radiculoneuritis
    Relapsing fever
    Reynaud's disease
    Reynold's syndrome Rheumatoid arthritis
    Rhinitis
    Rift Valley fever
    Rubella
    S

    Salmonella
    Salpingitis
    Scabies
    Scleroderma
    Senile dementia
    Senile macular degeneration
    Sennutsu fever
    Septicemia
    Shingles Shock
    Sickle cell anemia
    Sinusitis
    Skin burns
    Spinalioma
    Staphyloococcus
    Stiatonigral degeneration
    Stomatitis
    Stroke
    Syphilis
    T

    T.cruzi
    Tardive dyskinesia
    Tendinitis
    Tetanus
    Thoracic zygomycosis
    Thrombopenic purpura
    Thrombophlebitis
    Thyroiditis
    Tinea versicolor
    Tinnitus Togavirus
    Tourette syndrome
    Toxic amblyopia
    Toxoplasmosis
    Traveller's diarrhea
    Trench fever
    Trypanosomiasis
    Tuberculosis
    Tularemia
    U Ulcers
    Urethritis
    Urticaria Uterine spasm
    Uveitis
    V Varicella pneumonia
    Varicose veins Vascular retinopathy
    Vasculitis
    W Warts Wegener granulomatosis

    BANHO DE OZÔNIO – REVITALIZADOR CORPORAL

    Lembrando que esta é minha opinião sobre o Assunto!
    Se você fizer, faça por livre e espontânea vontade.
    Não deixe de consultar seu MEDICO antes!

    O vídeo mais completo sobre o Banho ozonizado do youtube! Pode pode procurar eu deixo…

    TRATAMENTO – HIDRO-OZONOTERAPIA

    * Indicado para o tratamento de TODAS as doenças.
    * Indicado para todos os problemas de pele.
    * Indicado para todos os problemas respiratórios.
    * Indicado para todos os problemas muscular.
    * Indicado para todos os problemas e distúrbios do sono.
    * Indicado para todos os tipos de dores.
    * Indicado para todos de tratamento de estética e Beleza.
    * Indicado para tratamento de feridas e pé diabético.

    DEDICATÓRIA

    Todos os méritos desse vídeo eu dedico ao meu professor Dr. Lair Ribeiro, pois foi através dele, que eu conheci Ozônio, que transforma os quadros de morte em vida.
    Obrigado Dr. Lair, pela sua grande contribuição na medicina, farei e darei o meu melhor para ensinar como o senhor ensina.

    LITERATURA USADA NAS PESQUISAS:

    LIVRO: Ozone – A New Medical Drug
    AUTOR: Velio Bocci

    LIVRO: Oxygen Prescription
    AUTOR: Nathaniel Altman

    LIVRO: Principles and Applications Ozone Therapy
    AUTOR: Dr frank

    LIVRO: Guia para el uso medico del Ozono
    AUTOR: Adriana

    LIVRO: Ozone The Rovolution end Dentistry

    DVD: Ozônio
    AUTOR: Dr. Lair Ribeiro

    VENDA DO APARELHO E OZONÍDEOS NO SITE

    CONTATOS:

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    Banco: Caixa Econômica Federal
    Titular: Samuel Gomes Camargo
    Conta: 00633729-6
    Op.: 013
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