6 million middle-aged people take no exercise

Public Health Englands research suggests large numbers of adults do not walk for 10 minutes at a time once a month

About 6 million middle-aged people in England are endangering their health by not taking so much as a brisk walk once a month, government advisers have said.

Clinicians said such a lack of exercise increases an individuals risk of prematurely developing serious health conditions including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dementia and cancer.

Public Health England (PHE) said 41% of the 15.3 million English adults aged 40 to 60 walk less than 10 minutes continuously each month at a brisk pace of at least 3mph.

PHE has launched a health campaign targeting the sedentary middle-aged by encouraging them to walk to the shop instead of using a car and to take up walking on lunch breaks to add many healthy years to their lives.

Health leaders believe that 10 minutes walking a day is likely to be seen as achievable by people who are chronically inactive and that the health benefits include increased fitness, improved mood, a healthier body weight and a 15% reduction in the risk of dying prematurely.

PHE said walking required no skill, facilities or equipment and was more accessible and acceptable than other forms of physical activity for most people. Guidance issued by the UKs four chief medical officers in 2011 instructed the British population on how much exercise they should be participating in each week.

They said that adults should do at least two and a half hours of moderately intensive activity a week.

The PHE report said a quarter of the English population are inactive, doing less than 30 minutes of exercise a week. For some of these individuals 150 minutes may seem an unrealistic aim, according to the PHE report.

PHEs One You campaign is urging those people to take up the challenge of walking briskly for 10 minutes a day. As part of the drive it has released the Active 10 app which will help users achieve the goal and GPs will be recommending it to their patients to help build up their activity levels.

Dr Jenny Harries, the deputy medical director of PHE, said: I know first hand that juggling the priorities of everyday life often means exercise takes a back seat.
Walking to the shops instead of driving or going for a brisk 10-minute walk on your lunch break each day can add many healthy years to your life. The Active 10 app is a free and easy way to help anyone build more brisk walking into their daily routine.

Prof Sir Muir Gray, a clinical adviser for the Active 10 app and the One You campaign, added: We all know physical activity is good for your health but for the first time were seeing the effects that easily achievable changes can make. By walking just 10 continuous minutes at a brisk pace every day, an individual can reduce their risk of early death by 15%.

They can also prevent or delay the onset of disability and further reduce their risk of serious health conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dementia and some cancers.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/24/around-6-million-middle-aged-english-people-take-no-exercise

We can cure Alzheimers if we stop ignoring it | Joseph Jebelli

Given focus and funding, Alzheimers will yield to science and reason, writes neuroscientist and author Joseph Jebelli

The terror of Alzheimers is that it acts by degrees, and can therefore bewilder family members as much as its victims. Those who first notice the onset of Alzheimers in a loved one tell of forgotten names and unsettling behaviour, of car keys found in the fridge and clothing in the kitchen cabinet, of aimless wanderings.

Naturally, they want to understand the boundaries of normal ageing and whether these are being crossed. Often, the answer arrives when theyre greeted as complete strangers, when the patients mind becomes irrevocably unmoored from its past. The disease is terrifying for its insidiousness as well as its long-term manifestations.

Fear partly explains why Alzheimers has been ignored for so long. Yet it is now the leading cause of death among the oldest people, and according to Professor Sir Michael Marmot, an expert in health inequalities, it could be an important part of the stagnation in increases in life expectancy since 2010 that he has identified.

As a researcher, I have been struck by how many patients speak openly about their condition only after receiving a diagnosis. I knew something wasnt right. Sometimes I dont know what day of the week it is or what I have to do, one newly diagnosed patient told me. I look in my calendar but then I think: why am I looking at this? My husband was the one who made me see a GP. I was too frightened. I thought I might have it but I didnt want to hear it.

My grandfather suppressed his concerns and agreed to see a doctor only after being hassled by his five children. By that point he had forgotten where he lived and was mistaking his wife, Afsana, for his first wife, Parry. Raising the issue with him wasnt easy; hed insist his memory was fine, and then happily discuss the health concerns of others. When faced with the stark reality of dementia, patients can retreat into themselves and some opt for silence.

But another factor is undoubtedly at work. For most of history, Alzheimers was a deeply taboo subject; those who had it were mad or just foolish. Although we think of Alzheimers as a modern disease, early accounts of dementia were described by the Roman philosopher Cicero and the Greek physician Galen. And yet only in the past two decades have we begun to realise Alzheimers is an affliction no less urgent than cancer or stroke.

And if people with other diseases of old age deserve recognition and action, then so do people with Alzheimers. The crisis around the funding of social care, and the attention focused on this during the general election campaign, has only increased the sense of urgency.

Where memory used to be viewed as a spectral, intangible quality, impossible to pin down, Alzheimers research now demonstrates the precise opposite that memory is a material phenomenon, an exquisite product of healthy brain cells that appears to reside in a network of durable connections between those brain cells. To say that this needs protecting is an understatement. Memory forms an individuals autobiography. It defines who we are. As the noted cognitive neuroscientist Michael Gazzaniga once said: Everything in life is memory, save for the thin edge of the present.

Worried
We know now that a therapy must be given in the very early stages of the disease, before symptoms appear. Photograph: Alamy

This is why the more I consider the governments approach to Alzheimers the more frustrated I become. Alzheimers costs the UK an estimated 26bn a year the combination of spending on healthcare, social care and lost earnings and taxes from people who have taken up caring roles in place of paid employment.

This is more than cancer, heart disease and stroke combined. And yet, astonishingly, only a fraction of 1% of that amount is spent on research. A hallmark of the NHS constitution is to improve health and wellbeing. In his 1939 address as president of the American Psychiatric Association, Richard Hutchings warned: Our institutions promise to become in time vast infirmaries with relatively small departments for younger patients with curable disorders.

Indeed, if things continue this way, epidemiologists estimate that the total number of Alzheimers cases will double every 20 years, making dementia the next global pandemic. In that event, the current 850,000 patients in the UK would represent no more than the tip of a vast, society-crippling iceberg.

Increasing the overall health budget is an option. A smarter strategy would be to reassess how funding is allocated in the first place. Cancer now causes fewer deaths each year than Alzheimers, but receives on average 13 times more funding. Eliminating cancer is vital, but we shouldnt pour all our efforts into one pandemic only to then be met by another. Given the advances made in understanding Alzheimers the signs and symptoms, the causes and risk factors, the genetics and neurobiology the number of therapies awaiting discovery is limitless.

The task of developing such therapies lies with the pharmaceutical industry. The problem is that many in the industry feel uneasy: between 2000 and 2012, in more than 400 clinical trials, only one drug was approved (Namenda, a drug similar to the Aricept generation of drugs, and similarly insufficient). In total, Alzheimers drug candidates have racked up a lamentable 99.6% failure rate even higher than cancer, at 81%. The recent failure of Eli Lillys solanezumab and Merck & Cos verubecestat hasnt helped.

But things are changing. We know now that a therapy must be given in the very early stages of the disease, before symptoms appear. And so Lilly, Merck and other companies are now testing drugs on patients in the newly defined preclinica phase of Alzheimers, with results expected by 2025. The role of academic researchers and patient advocates in all this is to keep championing the issue, to keep applying pressure as well as encouragement.

The word incurable is often used to describe Alzheimers. I have never liked the term because it is freighted with hopelessness. And it is wrong. Alzheimers will yield to science and reason; it will one day be as treatable as diabetes and HIV. The choice in front of us is how many generations we are willing to lose before that day comes.

The remarkable patients I met during my research, each teaching us something new and profound about the disease, deserve our action, not our sorrow. It is time to abolish their fear and silence. Its time to foster a seriousness of purpose that defeats Alzheimers once and for all.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jul/19/alzheimers-disease-death-old-people-science

Should link between dementia and artificial sweeteners be taken with a pinch of salt?

How peoples capacity for forgetfulness and lies may have impacted on research tying stroke and dementia to diet drinks

They were supposed to be the healthy alternative to their sugar-rich siblings. But now lovers of diet colas and other low-calorie drinks have been hit by news that will radically undermine those credentials: a counterintuitive study suggesting a link to stroke and dementia.

The study in the journal Stroke may cause a rethink among those worried about obesity, diabetes or a possible early heart attack from sugar-rich drinks who have been considering making a change. It comes to the alarming conclusion that people polishing off one can a day of artificially sweetened drink are nearly three times as likely to have a stroke or develop dementia.

Its a shocking conclusion. But the first reason to pause is that the study found no such risk in people who drank standard sugary lemonades and colas.

There is little previous evidence with regard to dementia, which is why the researchers were looking at it, but the link between sugar and stroke is very well known. Too much sugar raises the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart attacks and stroke. Its altogether a bad thing, which is why the World Health Organisation is telling us all to cut down. So what was going on in this study?

The evidence it analyses is pulled from the well-respected Framingham Heart Study a cohort of more than 5,000 people in Massachusetts, US, whose diets and lifestyles have been monitored for nearly 50 years, with the main objective of finding out more about heart disease. Along the way, researchers have looked at other health outcomes.

What they are up against is peoples capacity for forgetfulness and lies. This is the case with every study into the food we eat except for those rare ones, almost impossible to do today, which have in effect imprisoned their subjects and controlled every sip and mouthful they took.Researchers understand this and try to take account of it, but it is difficult.

There are several possible other reasons why an increased stroke risk was associated with diet drinks and not sugary drinks. One is what is called reverse causality. People who come to realise that they are ill and have a high risk of a stroke then switch their behaviour by choosing diet drinks long after sugary drinks have helped cause the problem.

When it came to dementia, the link with diet drinks that researchers saw disappeared once they took some elements of the health of the people in the study into account. When the researchers accounted for other risk factors for Alzheimers, such as risk genes, diabetes, heart disease, cholesterol levels and weight, this significant association was lost, suggesting that these drinks are not the whole story, said Dr Rosa Sancho, head of research at Alzheimers Research UK.

The researchers point to it themselves: We are unable to determine whether artificially sweetened soft drink intake increased the risk of incident dementia through diabetes mellitus or whether people with diabetes mellitus were simply more likely to consume diet beverages, they write. But they call for more research and others will support them in that.

Artificial sweeteners have been viewed with suspicion by a lot of consumers for many years and not entirely deservedly. They are not natural, in the way that sugar is natural, being grown from beet or cane. Some of the hostility comes from those who worry about ingesting man-made chemicals. But while some artificial flavourings have been shown to carry health risks, studies have failed to find similar problems with artificial sweeteners.

Aspartame has been extremely controversial since its approval for use by several European countries in the 1980s, says NHS Choices. In 1996, a study linked it to a rise in brain tumours. However, the study had very little scientific basis and later studies showed that aspartame was in fact safe to consume, says the NHS.

Large studies have also been carried out to look at whether the sweetener increased cancer risks, and gave it a clean bill of health. The European Food Safety Authority said in 2013 it was safe even for pregnant women and children, except for anyone with a rare genetic condition called phenylketonuria.

Dumping aspartame from its low calorie bestseller did not give PepsiCo the halo effect it hoped. In 2015, it announced it was taking the sweetener some people love to hate out of Diet Pepsi and replacing it with sucralose. A year later, when it became clear Coca Cola would not follow suit and that fans preferred their drink the way it used to be, it did a U-turn and put aspartame back in.

There have been huge efforts to develop artificial sweeteners that will taste as good as sugar and be acceptable to the doubters. Stevia, a plant extract, is marketed as a natural sweetener to the increasingly sceptical health-conscious.

Now it is not just drinks. Public Health England is putting pressure on food companies to cut 20% of sugar from their products by 2020. That will probably mean smaller chocolate bars, where artificial sweeteners just wont deliver the same taste. But they will be part of the answer in other foods.

Sweeteners such as sucralose, which is 650 times sweeter than sugar, have long been in breakfast cereals and salad dressings, while saccharin is in store-bought cakes, despite a scare over bladder cancer which caused the Canadian government to ban it as an additive in 1977. It lifted the ban in 2014. The safety debate will go on, but artificial sweeteners are likely to play a bigger part in our diet as the squeeze on sugar ramps up.

There are those, however, who think artificial sweeteners will never be the answer to obesity and the diseases that follow in its wake. The problem, in their view, is our sweet tooth and the answer is to reduce our liking for sweetness. So they want to see the gradual reduction of the amount of sugar in our drinks and our food and snacks without it.

It worked with salt, says Cash, the campaign for action on salt and health, which did much to bring down the salt levels in our food without our noticing it. The same should be possible for sugar. But not if artificial substitutes are used to keep our food and drinks tasting just as sweet as they did before.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/apr/21/link-dementia-stroke-diet-drinks-artificial-sweeteners-study

The Top Diseases Part 1- Cause and Solutions for including Heart Disease, Cancer, Reflux Esophagitis

Expert Panel Hosts: Brian Clement, Joel Fuhrman, Brenda Davis, Roger L. Greenlaw

• Brian Clement – Learn how to transform your lifestyle from toxic and self-destructive to healthful and self-affirming, and experience renewed energy and vitality that will last a lifetime. Hippocrates Institute director Brian Clement shows how the Hippocrates LifeForce program implements the use of raw living foods to help people maintain a healthful weight and stimulate natural immune defenses other chronic illnesses. Discover how to develop the positive frame of mind that supports good health, learn how to make the transition to eating raw living foods at home, while dining out, and when traveling.

• Joel Fuhrman – The New York Times bestselling author of Eat to Live and Super Immunity and one of the country’s leading experts on preventive medicine offers a scientifically proven, practical program to prevent and reverse diabetes—without drugs. At last, a breakthrough program to combat the rising diabetes epidemic and help millions of diabetics, as well as those suffering with high blood pressure and heart disease. Joel Fuhrman, M.D. Research director of the Nutritional Research Foundation, shows you how to live a long, healthy, and happy life—disease free. He offers a complete health transformation, starting with a diet with a high nutrient-per-calorie ratio that can be adapted for individual needs.

• Brenda Davis – explores the benefits of a vegan diet (eating without meat, eggs or dairy products). More people are realizing the impact of their nutritional choices on their health, the environment, animal rights, and human hunger. As a registered dietitian, Davis is well-qualified to provide information on how a vegan diet can protect against chronic illnesses, how to obtain all the protein and calcium you need without meat or dairy products, as well as the importance of Vitamin B12 and good fats in vegan diets. She shows how to achieve optimal weight, and gives tips on how to deal gracefully with a non-vegan world.

• Roger Greenlaw – “One of the unique outcomes I observe in my practice is when you treat the root cause of one condition, (obesity, heartburn and constipation caused by poor diet,inactivity and stress) many of the patient’s other conditions begin to improve simultaneously, (blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and resting pulse). When you treat one, you treat them all.” Now at the end of a decade of treating patients with a holistic approach Greenlaw said he finds that almost all his patients are interested in lifestyle change. “Most diseases in our society are lifestyle related, and therefore preventable and modifiable by self care.”His recommendation to other practitioners is embrace the arrival of the age of Lifestyle Medicine and the modification of disease through self care and natural therapies. “Lifestyle Medicine may be our best treatment ally yet to facilitate disease prevention, reversal and rehabilitation,” Greenlaw said.

HBP 030- How High Blood Pressure cause a stroke and other brain damages

Discover how High Blood Pressure Leads to brain damages.

Please also see our other videos on High Blood Pressure. 67 videos related to this topic has been uploaded on this channel.

For more information, or to join our groups and discussions please visit pthealthsupportnetwork.com.

My Theory on Dementia, Blood Pressure & Stroke – Dr. Eric Berg DC

Take Dr. Berg's Body Type Quiz:

Dr. Berg talks about his theory on dementia, blood pressure control and stroke. There are a lot of unknowns about dementia. But there is an interesting associated factor, i.e. the build up of calcium in the arteries of the brain. Also, if the arteries get packed with calcium packing, the arteries get hard and it might be one of the causes for high blood pressure. Stroke is a situation of blocking of vascular blood flow to the brain.

Dosages to try: Healthy normal person: Vitamin D3 (10,000 IUs) + Vitamin K2 (MK-7) (100mcg) per day
Unhealthy person: Vitamin D3 (30,000 IUs) + Vitamin K2 (MK-7) (300mcg) per day

Vitamin D and K2 work together and help to mobilize calcium. You may want to consume both vitamins, in the morning with butter or coconut oil for better absorption (due to being fat soluble). Vitamin D3 is about absorption of calcium and vitamin K2 is about directing where calcium goes – both working together to keep your arteries and soft tissues clean and your bones strong.
Unless you have osteoporosis, I would not recommend taking extra calcium. Instead consume some cheese on a daily basis. Most of the calcium in the body is recycled so adding more, is not needed. Never consume calcium carbonate (limestone) as your calcium.
If you take calcium and vitamin D without K2, you may be in danger of excess calcium build up – calcification of your vessels. Yet K2 is a powerful inhibitor of calcification of soft tissues.
If you need help digesting fats or are missing a gallbladder, I recommend a product called Gallbladder Formula: YXFL8TVG 10% off

CONNECTION BETWEEN CALCIUM AND DEMENTIA (MEMORY PROBLEMS)

CONNECTION BETWEEN CALCIUM AND HEART ATTACK

CONNECTION BETWEEN CALCIUM AND STROKE

VITAMIN K2

K2 is present in: *grass-fed beef, yogurt, cheese, butter *goose liver *hard cheese and brie *grass-fed egg yolks *Sauerkraut (raw) *grass-fed kefir *Kimchi

Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio:
Dr. Berg, 50 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional and natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government and the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning, published by KB Publishing in January 2011. Dr. Berg trains chiropractors, physicians and allied healthcare practitioners in his methods, and to date he has trained over 2,500 healthcare professionals. He has been an active member of the Endocrinology Society, and has worked as a past part-time adjunct professor at Howard University.

DR. BERG'S VIDEO BLOG:

Disclaimer: Dr. Berg does not diagnose, treat or prevent any medical conditions; instead he helps people create their health to avoid health problems. He works with their physicians, which regular their medication.
This video is not designed to and does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment or services to you or to any other individual. Through my videos, blog posts, website information, I give suggestions for you and your doctor to research and provide general information for educational purposes only. The information provided in this video or site, or through linkages to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider. The Health & Wellness and Dr. Eric Berg, D.C. are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.

Oxygenating Blood With Nitrate-Rich Vegetables

Subscribe for free to Dr. Greger's videos at:

DESCRIPTION: Vegetables such as beets and arugula can improve athletic performance by improving oxygen delivery and utilization, but what about for those who really need it—such as those with emphysema, high blood pressure, and peripheral artery disease?

Nitrates are one of the reasons I recommend eating dark green leafy vegetables every day. Beets are another good option (not just drinking the juice—see my last video Whole Beets vs. Juice for Improving Athletic Performance ).

What else can we do for high blood pressure? See:
Hibiscus Tea vs. Plant-Based Diets for Hypertension ( )
Flax Seeds for Hypertension ( )
How to Prevent High Blood Pressure with Diet ( )
How to Treat High Blood Pressure with Diet ( )
High Blood Pressure May Be a Choice ( )

Why is blood flow to the brain so important? I go into depth on the potential consequences in Alzheimer’s and Atherosclerosis of the Brain ( ).

More on diet and pelvic blood flow in men here:
Atkins Diet: Trouble Keeping It Up ( )
Watermelon as Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction ( )
Survival of the Firmest: Erectile Dysfunction and Death ( )
Pistachio Nuts for Erectile Dysfunction ( )
BPA Plastic and Male Sexual Dysfunction ( )

Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at and he'll try to answer it!

• Facebook:
• Twitter:
• Podcast:
• Subscribe:
• Donate: